How do you burn calories off? And why?

Submitted by moneymaker on March 17, 2017 - 1:47am
treadmill/walking/jogging/running
29% (6 votes)
swimming
5% (1 vote)
cycling/spin/stationary bike
24% (5 votes)
some other way
29% (6 votes)
Exercise? What's that?
14% (3 votes)
Total votes: 21
Submitted by moneymaker on March 17, 2017 - 2:20am.

I like the treadmill now because I can measure distance/time/calories, can watch TV while doing it. It is exempt from weather issues, in other words I can do it at any time I want, even 2AM. Admittedly if it weren't for the TV it would be boring.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on March 17, 2017 - 6:16am.

Exercise is great for staying healthy etc...

But it is a lousy way to lose weight.

Sorry counting your calories as they are going in works much better.

Anyway IMO.

Submitted by zk on March 17, 2017 - 7:09am.

I started using an elliptical over 10 years ago. I lost 20 pounds and kept it off, with no real change to my diet. I use interval training with some very intense intervals, which works great for me.

The resistance level on an elliptical is adjustable, and it works (and builds) your muscles more than a treadmill, especially in the glutes, hips, upper legs, obliques, shoulders, and arms. And of course, lean muscle mass burns more calories, even at rest, than fat.

Losing weight is relatively easy. People do it all the time. Keeping it off is a completely different story. Think about the number of people you know who've lost weight compared to the number who have kept it off for more than a couple years (or even a year). Almost everybody I know who has lost and kept off a significant amount of weight has used vigorous exercise as a primary method of keeping off the weight.

Why exercise? Imagine if there were a drug that did all this, with no adverse side effects (except the pain of hard work), and for free, no less:

https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/bas...

Who wouldn't take that drug? Exercise is as close to a "miracle drug" as there is. Even though it's neither miracle nor drug. It's just a lot of hard work.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on March 17, 2017 - 7:24am.

You cannot outrun the fork.

You still need to watch what you eat no matter how much you exercise.

I have found it is not hard to keep my calories below 2000.

I just have a whey protein shake (130 or so calories) instead of dinner I don't feel hungry.

Anyway I feel great now days after losing 30 pounds in about 5 months.

Submitted by zk on March 17, 2017 - 7:32am.

The-Shoveler wrote:
You cannot outrun the fork.

You still need to watch what you eat no matter how much you exercise.

I Agree. I didn't really change my diet. But maybe I didn't go nuts before, either. Maybe I'd have weighed another 10 or 20 pounds if I hadn't been a little bit careful. I try not to gorge myself late in the evening or at night. I don't drink sugary drinks. Stuff like that.

In my opinion, almost nobody has the will power to eat few enough calories to keep a significant amount of weight off for...well, basically permanently, because, really, that's the goal, right? From what I've seen, you need to exercise, in addition to watching what you eat, in order to keep a significant amount of weight off permanently.

Submitted by spdrun on March 17, 2017 - 7:34am.

Your body always tries to return to its highest weight...
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/healt...

I just walk. and run. I live in the city, so easy to do.

Submitted by zk on March 17, 2017 - 7:35am.

The-Shoveler wrote:

Anyway I feel great now days after losing 30 pounds in about 5 months.

That's fantastic.

I highly recommend vigorous exercise as a way to help make that weight loss permanent.

Submitted by zk on March 17, 2017 - 7:58am.

spdrun wrote:
Your body always tries to return to its highest weight...
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/healt...

From that article:

But Dr. Ludwig said that simply cutting calories was not the answer. “There are no doubt exceptional individuals who can ignore primal biological signals and maintain weight loss for the long term by restricting calories,” he said, but he added that “for most people, the combination of incessant hunger and slowing metabolism is a recipe for weight regain — explaining why so few individuals can maintain weight loss for more than a few months.”

"Ignore primal biological signals." Ouch.

I'm rooting for you, shoveler. That's why I keep recommending vigorous exercise if you want to keep the weight off. And it has all those other benefits:

https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/bas...

Submitted by The-Shoveler on March 17, 2017 - 8:11am.

Thanks zk

I do exercise every morning (not too much but enough), in addition I do go for long walks with the wife on the weekends (mostly on the beach).

I actually have to start watching that I don't lose too much weight, I have gotten used to not eating dinner and now I have almost gone underweight.

I have taken to splurging on the weekends for a dinner out just so I don't lose too much.

Submitted by moneymaker on March 17, 2017 - 9:01am.

Both schools of thought have benefits. Eating less means you might live longer, working out means you will be stronger. I think as people age their brains revert to adolescents and think they need to eat more (think puberty) when they really don't need to. A lot of it is hormonal changes, which reminds me of a joke my grandfather used to tell, how do you make a w***e moan?

Submitted by moneymaker on March 17, 2017 - 11:00am.

Brain reversion theory explains midlife crisis, which I haven't experienced yet but could happen at anytime! Maybe I went right through it and didn't notice as my teenage years were rather mundane.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on March 17, 2017 - 2:55pm.

Yeah, calorie counting is the way.
You just need to prioritize the less calorie dense items and match fuel intake to consumption.

I'm not vegan or vegetarian but I follow a vegan dude on YouTube. He an amateur athlete who eats all day. He used to be chubby. I know he's legit because he logs his bike rides online.

Become a food snob. Think of it this way.... some people think they are too good to live in certain neighborhoods. Food is the same... you're too good to consume certain foods.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on March 17, 2017 - 2:59pm.

moneymaker wrote:
Both schools of thought have benefits. Eating less means you might live longer, working out means you will be stronger. I think as people age their brains revert to adolescents and think they need to eat more (think puberty) when they really don't need to. A lot of it is hormonal changes, which reminds me of a joke my grandfather used to tell, how do you make a w***e moan?

Chemical changes is because of all the processed food, the OTC and prescription drugs we take.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on March 21, 2017 - 11:06am.

New studies show that popping pills is bad for health.

When I shop at Costco, I'm aghast at the 500 pill jars of OTC medication that people buy. I would not consume that in a lifetime!

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/03/20/we...

Submitted by meadandale on March 21, 2017 - 4:18pm.

The-Shoveler wrote:
Exercise is great for staying healthy etc...

But it is a lousy way to lose weight.

Sorry counting your calories as they are going in works much better.

Anyway IMO.

Exercise is a lousy way to lose weight...but "calories in/calories out" is a myth.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on March 21, 2017 - 8:50pm.

meadandale wrote:

Exercise is a lousy way to lose weight...but "calories in/calories out" is a myth.

Wow. Calorie intake is the most basic reason for weight gain.

I don't dispute addiction and cravings and people behaving as a function of their environment. But I guarantee you that if someone lived with me and followed my prescriptions, that person would be a healthy weight

Why is it that in this society we expect people to be financially healthy, but we don't expect people to develop physically heathful behavior. In my opinion, making money is a lot harder.

Tonight I had some sashimi with rice i cooked myself at home. Then I had a green salad and a vegetable smoothie with a whole bitter melon (tastes bitter but it's good for health) I made in the vitamix. I'll have a whole fresh coconut before going to bed.

Submitted by SK in CV on March 21, 2017 - 9:44pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:

Chemical changes is because of all the processed food, the OTC and prescription drugs we take.

Right, because before processed foods and drugs, humans didn't ever get old, or sick and they didn't die.

Wait....whut?

Submitted by no_such_reality on March 22, 2017 - 7:21am.

FlyerInHi wrote:
meadandale wrote:

Exercise is a lousy way to lose weight...but "calories in/calories out" is a myth.

Wow. Calorie intake is the most basic reason for weight gain.

I don't dispute addiction and cravings and people behaving as a function of their environment. But I guarantee you that if someone lived with me and followed my prescriptions, that person would be a healthy weight

Why is it that in this society we expect people to be financially healthy, but we don't expect people to develop physically heathful behavior. In my opinion, making money is a lot harder.

Actually our economy is in large parts driving by people being neither. The vast majority of the financial sector is driven on people consuming too much debt and trusting experts that return less than a simple ETF index stock while taking massive payouts.

Everything around food seems to have become a massive disinformation campaign. Free-range, organic, or the IMHO, the best one, vegetarian chickens... not to mention the organic aquaponic grown salads...

Calories out has to be greater than calories in, it's just that calories in determines if you have any available calories to put out or just want to eat.

Meanwhile, I've seen stuff that says bitter melon is bad for you, stuff that says good for you, and stuff that says we need studies that aren't crappy to figure it out.

Turmeric is good for you, unless it's turmeric that's grown in traditional locals heavily contaminated with lead and other heavy metals.

And omega3/6 rich fish is super healthy for you. Except when we farm raise it and it really isn't.

and so on...

Submitted by zk on March 22, 2017 - 8:00am.

meadandale wrote:
The-Shoveler wrote:
Exercise is great for staying healthy etc...

But it is a lousy way to lose weight.

Sorry counting your calories as they are going in works much better.

Anyway IMO.

Exercise is a lousy way to lose weight

It worked great for me. In any case, losing weight is the easy part. Keeping it off is the hard part, judging by the massive number of people who are able to lose weight and the relatively minuscule number who can keep it off. And that's where exercise is essential:

"Strong scientific evidence shows that physical activity can help you maintain your weight over time."

https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/bas...

But Dr. Ludwig said that simply cutting calories was not the answer. “There are no doubt exceptional individuals who can ignore primal biological signals and maintain weight loss for the long term by restricting calories,” he said, but he added that “for most people, the combination of incessant hunger and slowing metabolism is a recipe for weight regain — explaining why so few individuals can maintain weight loss for more than a few months.

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/healt...

Submitted by no_such_reality on March 22, 2017 - 8:45am.

Sitting on your ass all day is mightier than the gym.

Big difference between physical activity and gym based exercise.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on March 22, 2017 - 12:46pm.

one way to find out it to conduct an experiment.

get some mice and separate them into 2 groups. both groups get an all you can eat diet 24/7.

Group 1 gets diet coke and a menu of modern american comfort food (pizza, brownies, chips, etc...).

Group 2 gets water and veggies (carrots, celery, etc.. some protein maybe swiss cheese).

Great experiment if you have kids. What better way to let them see for themselves?

Submitted by zk on March 22, 2017 - 5:33pm.

no_such_reality wrote:
Sitting on your ass all day is mightier than the gym.

Big difference between physical activity and gym based exercise.

Seems like that would depend on the physical activity and the gym-based exercise.

I would say most gym-based exercise is much more intense than most daily physical activity. And less of the higher-intensity exercise is required to maintain fitness than lower-intensity exercise:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifest...

I doubt that many people who are into high-intensity exercise at the gym are "sitting on their ass all day" when they're not at the gym.

Submitted by no_such_reality on March 22, 2017 - 9:05pm.

Decent exercise is better than not. My intent was much like the fork line, our sedentary office jobs are really self defeating.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on March 22, 2017 - 10:16pm.

Food knowledge is important. I learned a few things over the years and I'm able to make my own healthy meals.

These guys are cool. Not a bad approach to a modified western diet for those who have primal cravings.

https://youtu.be/Z5KwRV7Se1w

Submitted by poorgradstudent on March 23, 2017 - 9:58am.

I try to take two 20-30 minute walks a day at work. It's good for my mental health to get some sunshine on my face, especially in the winter months.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on March 23, 2017 - 4:11pm.

Yes sunlight is very good. Notice how pets will naturally sun themselves a little everyday.

I don't get people who have heavy drapes and dark homes. I find it dépressing. I just have simple roller white shades for when privacy is necessary.

Submitted by ltsdd on March 24, 2017 - 8:56am.

FlyerInHi wrote:
Group 2 gets water and veggies (carrots, celery, etc.. some protein maybe swiss cheese).
?

If this is what you call living. More power to you.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on March 24, 2017 - 7:23pm.

ltsdd wrote:
FlyerInHi wrote:
Group 2 gets water and veggies (carrots, celery, etc.. some protein maybe swiss cheese).
?

If this is what you call living. More power to you.

It's not all that bad. Japanese green tea cake instead of chocolatey, gooey messy, not yummy to me lava cake. Quality over quantity.

Submitted by flu on March 25, 2017 - 7:25am.

I try to run about 3 miles each day, either on a treadmill or outside. I've been doing this routine for a little over a year now. I think I've current more fit than I've ever been, even when I was in my 20ies.

The problem i noticed is that it's hard on my joints,particularly since i have bunions on my big toe (from all the high heels I use to wear, j/k)...

I think I get a much better run on a treadmill since I can set clear speed and hill grade goals, that forces me to keep a certain pace (or fall off the treadmill)...versus if I just run outside, I tend not to pace myself as hard.

Also, running outside, I end up having to put a bunch of sunblock on, hat, glasses since burn easily...so I'm not terribly excited about trading off losing weight for getting eventual skin cancer.

Elliptical gliders don't do it for me.

The biggest challenge is when you are done, and get hungry, you don't go off and pig out..Otherwise you just wasted your time...

Submitted by mixxalot on March 25, 2017 - 10:49am.

I lost almost a 100 pounds about 10 years ago and have kept it off. I do following:

Lift weights few times a week
Walk
Treadmill
Cook own meals

I switched from milk to unsweetened almond milk to make my morning lattes as it has less carbs and fewer calories. More protein and veggies and less bread/rice.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on March 26, 2017 - 12:20pm.

Congrats mixxalot, I have a buddy who should be talking to you, but he won't.

The full skinny on obesity from UCTV. I have not watched it yet. It came up in my feed.
https://youtu.be/moQZd1-BC0Y

Submitted by ucodegen on March 26, 2017 - 2:47pm.

FlyerInHi wrote:
Congrats mixxalot, I have a buddy who should be talking to you, but he won't.

The full skinny on obesity from UCTV. I have not watched it yet. It came up in my feed.
https://youtu.be/moQZd1-BC0Y


Thanks for the link.

I do it by hiking (aggressive pace - ie. bottom of Iron to top in an hour or less). I try to do it at least a once a week. I also try to walk for about an hour every other day during the week.

I do disagree with some of the premises of the video though.

Submitted by flyer on March 26, 2017 - 5:29pm.

We've always enjoyed running/walking at the beach as often as possible, along with sports, other exercise and good eating habits. Why? as the OP asked. Because I think we all want to feel as good as we can for as long as we can, and being outside is an added + that definitely clears the mind.

I played a lot of sports when I was younger, and, as flu said, exercise can take it's toll on the joints. In my case, the knees are the problem.

I've never wanted to take cortisone shots unless absolutely necessary, so my MD recommended Euflexxa injections a few years ago. It's a natural substance (nonsteroidal hyaluronic acid) that helps to mobilize the joints, and is considered viscosupplementation. I've recommended it to friends, but it doesn't work for everyone. There are other options available, in case anyone else might need to check it out.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on March 27, 2017 - 8:20am.

IMO losing excess weight is more important than the exercise (although moderate exercise is good)

losing excess weight will help the knee's (+other joints) and things like blood pressure.

Submitted by flyer on March 27, 2017 - 3:52pm.

Agree. In our case, we've always been able to maintain our best weight for our height and build through proper diet (neither my wife nor I have ever been overweight) and exercise is something we really enjoy.

If anything, I've probably exercised too much, as the doc attributes my knee issues to overuse over the years, but these things are different for everyone.

Submitted by NotCranky on June 1, 2017 - 8:30am.

Some of you might want to check out the book, Younger Next Year.
The authors are promoting the book for anyone approaching 50 or older. It's a fun read, well I like exercise and exercise science info, so there's that. It is deliberately styled to be funny.

It covers cardio and strength training for aging men pretty well. Just the whole need for physical fitness and the biological process of it more than how to. One of the authors claims that not exercising almost daily in the 3rd period of life will one day be considered as self- abusive as smoking multiple packs of cigarettes has come to be viewed.

It's also as much a motivational book as a exercise science read.
The motivation comes from the promise of healthier joints, stronger bones, less cancer and other lifestyle diseases, less open heart surgeries which are described in brutal detail, better energy and mood, more agility and balance, more fun including slower sex decline. Just a better quality of life until nearly the end. This is instead of a somewhat typical and miserable abrupt downward curve marked by avoidable health issues. They claim that 70 percent of "age related" illness and injury is avoidable. Most exercisers who stay involved in life , after getting younger physically from whatever fitness level they start with, get to decline on a slight slope and go fast when it's time.

Submitted by njtosd on June 1, 2017 - 12:21pm.

Intermittent fasting also appears to be helpful (taken separately from exercise) in combatting the aging process, possibly through increased expression of SIRT -1 : https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article...

I thought it would be difficult but it's very easy to adjust to.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 1, 2017 - 3:00pm.

NotCranky wrote:
Some of you might want to check out the book, Younger Next Year.
The authors are promoting the book for anyone approaching 50 or older. It's a fun read, well I like exercise and exercise science info, so there's that. It is deliberately styled to be funny.

It covers cardio and strength training for aging men pretty well. Just the whole need for physical fitness and the biological process of it more than how to. One of the authors claims that not exercising almost daily in the 3rd period of life will one day be considered as self- abusive as smoking multiple packs of cigarettes has come to be viewed.

It's also as much a motivational book as a exercise science read.
The motivation comes from the promise of healthier joints, stronger bones, less cancer and other lifestyle diseases, less open heart surgeries which are described in brutal detail, better energy and mood, more agility and balance, more fun including slower sex decline. Just a better quality of life until nearly the end. This is instead of a somewhat typical and miserable abrupt downward curve marked by avoidable health issues. They claim that 70 percent of "age related" illness and injury is avoidable. Most exercisers who stay involved in life , after getting younger physically from whatever fitness level they start with, get to decline on a slight slope and go fast when it's time.

I have not read the book but the recommendations sound intuitive to me.
I so agree with the self abusive, self inflicted part.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on June 1, 2017 - 3:22pm.

I have been reading a few articles on fasting.
And RESTRICTING YOUR EATING TIME during a day to say 8 or 6 hours (sort of micro fasting)
Very interesting.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 1, 2017 - 3:29pm.

njtosd wrote:
Intermittent fasting also appears to be helpful (taken separately from exercise) in combatting the aging process, possibly through increased expression of SIRT -1 : https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article...

I thought it would be difficult but it's very easy to adjust to.

Interesting article because it mentions dog longevity. My big dog were always thin easily lived 18-20 before I put them down. When i see fat dogs, I think that they are being abused despite the love that owners show.

I practice calorie restriction and interminent fasting. Never a headache, no pain of any kind. Asian, clear watery soups are great for that. In western cuisine that would be clear bouillon soups. Most people consider those soups bland but I find them delicious.

Submitted by The-Shoveler on June 1, 2017 - 3:52pm.

I have been doing restricting my eating time (micro fasting) without really knowing it, (well at least during the work week during my day Job, much easier to control things like eating in a controlled schedule setting).

I don't eat dinner during the work week so my eating time during the day is between 6 and 7 hours.

Weekends I just eat whatever at whatever times as we are all over the place working or having fun when possible.

I must have loss 30 pounds over the last year. now within + or - 3 pounds of my Ideal weight/height.

The weird thing is I seem to have grown about 3 inches,

Submitted by ocrenter on June 2, 2017 - 4:14am.

this is the wrong question to ask.

Do not aim to burn calories, more importantly, ask how you burn off stress.

Stress ultimately leads to excessive craving. Thus activities that burn off stress lead to reduction in intake.

Submitted by ocrenter on June 2, 2017 - 4:17am.

The-Shoveler wrote:
I have been doing restricting my eating time (micro fasting) without really knowing it, (well at least during the work week during my day Job, much easier to control things like eating in a controlled schedule setting).

I don't eat dinner during the work week so my eating time during the day is between 6 and 7 hours.

Weekends I just eat whatever at whatever times as we are all over the place working or having fun when possible.

I must have loss 30 pounds over the last year. now within + or - 3 pounds of my Ideal weight/height.

The weird thing is I seem to have grown about 3 inches,

We do not eat dinner either.

Largest meal in the morning, minimal snacking at night.

Great job with the weight loss. 30 lbs = 120 lbs of pressure off your knees.

Submitted by NotCranky on June 2, 2017 - 8:47pm.

njtosd wrote:
Intermittent fasting also appears to be helpful (taken separately from exercise) in combatting the aging process, possibly through increased expression of SIRT -1 : https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article...

I thought it would be difficult but it's very easy to adjust to.

I recently dropped to my leanest since high school. I actually backed off on exercise, because I do a lot and wanted to cut the stress of it while restricting calories. With that I did a calorie deficit and increase focus on high nutrient foods( from an omnivores perspective) , cut back on desserts. At times I was tempted by how easy it would be to do a stupidly large calorie deficit. I read a little about it and found that under eating can actually have an addictive component to it. Something about hormonal, or other chemical secretions. It makes sense given the disease, or disorder, or whatever anorexia is. People suffering from it are definitely addictive mode. Probably a very old biological aid in lean times, which for most humans were pretty regular occurrences.

Another alternative to fasting is doing a real long duration low to moderate HR cardio binge every 3 weeks or so. Low is good enough, like 65-70% or max HR. Three of four hours continuous. It can be done fasted if there is excess body fat, or even if there is not(there's always enough body fat unless aforementioned anorexia or other illness is at play) . I prefer this to sedentary fasting at this time.

Submitted by Reality on June 3, 2017 - 12:11am.

The-Shoveler wrote:
I have been doing restricting my eating time (micro fasting) without really knowing it, (well at least during the work week during my day Job, much easier to control things like eating in a controlled schedule setting).

I don't eat dinner during the work week so my eating time during the day is between 6 and 7 hours.

Weekends I just eat whatever at whatever times as we are all over the place working or having fun when possible.

I must have loss 30 pounds over the last year. now within + or - 3 pounds of my Ideal weight/height.

The weird thing is I seem to have grown about 3 inches,

I stopped eating a large late dinner sometime last year because of acid reflux while sleeping.

A lot of days lunch is my last meal. Otherwise I'll eat something right after getting home (about 5). No more acid reflux and about a 20 pound weight loss without even thinking about it.

Submitted by FlyerInHi on June 4, 2017 - 2:01pm.

Another way to cut calories is to stop eating too much meat. Lower your cancer risks also.
Little meat, lots of variety of fruit and veggies is the way to go if you want to live a long time and enjoy your financial prudence. It's no use to be prudent financially but reckless with your health.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/...

I have given up grilling altogether. I now find the practice barbaric and very polluting. Better cook on/in an efficient electric appliance that doesn't lose much energy, like an instant pot.

Submitted by svelte on June 7, 2017 - 6:35pm.

Reducing calorie intake is preferably to burning them off.

We exercise 1 hr four times a week mostly for toning, we've cut out diet to lean meat (small portions of turkey, chicken or fish), fruits and vegetables. Except Fri and Sat night, where we eat whatever we want for dinner (within reason and in smaller portions than before). Desserts are forboden on all nights. That eliminates craving and rewards us for being good all week. Not that I was ever a big foodie, I had just developed bad habits.

Besides toning, the other advantage to exercising on weeknights is that it tires me out so that I sleep well.

I'm slowly coming to the opinion that scaredy professed that bread is poison for the body. I truly do think I can tell a difference during periods when I have cut it out.

Submitted by mixxalot on June 17, 2017 - 12:48pm.

I like walking a few miles from my home to the beach and back. The ocean breezes and views of the OB pier are my reward for the sweat.