The Daily California Malfeasance Report

User Forum Topic
Submitted by no_such_reality on June 5, 2012 - 9:01am

Just a fun little OT forum topic. I thought I'd see how long I can find at least one article Statewide.

Over the years, I've seen the City of Bell scandal. The Sheriff Corona scandal. Fire recruits setting wildfires, Fire fighters letting their equipment be used in porn shoots and fighting discipline actions, teachers having sex with students, cops doing all manners of things. So let's see what we find on a daily basis.

I'm only looking for one, maybe we'll get lucky and have a few days were we can't find one.

From yesterday's LA Times.


Merced Teacher accused of having sex with 15 year old.
So far, it's just an accusation.

Two police officers accused of conspiracy in dismissing traffic tickets for alcohol.

Again, only accused. Arraignment later this month.

From today's LA Times. I was hoping an election day would make it slow...
Two brothers sentenced in defrauding LA Housing Authority Don't worry, they're not government workers, but their other brother, on the run, was a Housing Authority Superviser who is accused of making it happen.

Submitted by briansd1 on June 5, 2012 - 7:51pm.

Same as in China?

Some of my Chinese friends say its the same here but with more sophistication.

Submitted by no_such_reality on June 6, 2012 - 8:48am.

Wednesday June 6

LA Unified Employee seeks more in Cortines Settlement

"Attorneys for Scot Graham, who accused former Supt. Ramon Cortines of sexual harassment, say the district's handling of the settlement invaded his privacy."

"The school system announced May 23 that the school board had approved paying $200,000 and providing lifetime benefits to Graham, a senior manager for 12 years in the facilities division who earned about $150,000 a year"

Submitted by no_such_reality on June 7, 2012 - 6:46am.

June 7, 2012: A little closer to SD for you.
Sweetwater School boardmember returns to work at Southwestern College after pleading not guilty to 8 felony corruption charges

Warehouse employee reinstated after pornography and masturbation accusation Apparently watching porn on a cell phone may be part of their duties.

"After conducting a hearing in May, Commissioner Francesca Krauel on Wednesday said she found the employee had watched about 90 seconds of pornography on a cell phone while at work but saw no proof he fondled himself.

Krauel said warehouse employees sometimes view pornography as part of their duties, which include storing property left by people who die without a will.

She added that the worker admitted his conduct was inappropriate but she thought the punishment was too extreme."

Submitted by harvey on June 7, 2012 - 6:54am.

Of course we can't leave out this one:

http://blog.sfgate.com/bottomline/2012/0...

The Securities and Exchange Commission today charged the former CEO of the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) and his close personal friend with scheming to defraud an investment firm into paying $20 million in fees to the friend’s placement agent firms.

Oops, I think I broke the "daily" rule with this post.

Submitted by sdrealtor on June 7, 2012 - 7:01am.

CalPERS CEO = Wall Street Bankster?

Submitted by flu on June 7, 2012 - 3:19pm.

NCTD security boss double dipped...

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/jun/...

State rules NCTD security boss double-dipped
Former Carlsbad police chief must return pension payments

Absolutely shameless. Some of our government workers..

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 7, 2012 - 5:10pm.

no_such_reality wrote:
June 7, 2012: A little closer to SD for you.
Sweetwater School boardmember returns to work at Southwestern College after pleading not guilty to 8 felony corruption charges

Warehouse employee reinstated after pornography and masturbation accusation Apparently watching porn on a cell phone may be part of their duties.

"After conducting a hearing in May, Commissioner Francesca Krauel on Wednesday said she found the employee had watched about 90 seconds of pornography on a cell phone while at work but saw no proof he fondled himself.

Krauel said warehouse employees sometimes view pornography as part of their duties, which include storing property left by people who die without a will.

She added that the worker admitted his conduct was inappropriate but she thought the punishment was too extreme."

re: Arlie Ricasa - the "fat lady" hasn't sung in her case yet and you're already making assumptions. The "DA" has gotten overnight "search warrants" to raid many, many offices and homes over the last few decades. A good portion of these "raids" were later found to be retaliatory and an invasion of privacy in subsequent civil litigation.

re: the Public Administrator whse worker: Cmsr Krauel is correct. A 90-day suspension was in order for inappropriate viewing of porn on county time. The employee's "supervisor" obviously "made up" the "fondling part" expressly to "trump up the charges to termination level." When push came to shove and he/she couldn't bring in "witnesses" to the "fondling" (or they ended up going "south" on him/her on the stand), the Dept lost their case. None of this is uncommon in the county's "Kangaroo Court." Nor it is uncommon at all for a "supervisor" to trump up disciplinary charges on a subordinate with whom they consider a "rival" or have deep-seated jealousies of which go wa-a-a-a-y back ... yes, even to childhood :=0

Sadly, nothing will likely happen to the supervisor, even though he/she caused their Department to incur many thousands in salary for unworked time and also legal representation by County Counsel, for which they were billed. It's all "funny money" which was removed from their annual "budget."

Just look at the public comments on the UT article. An "Estate Mover" has got to be THE sh!ttiest job in the county! Literally. The County Public Administrator handles estates of decedents who die intestate and their "heirs," if any, cannot be located. The vast majority of these decedents were "recluses" and also renters. The landlord wants their property back but more often than not, the decedents hoarded all manner of things and trash and their residences are emptied out by "Estate Movers" (classification of the "subject employee"). The Job bulletin for this position states, in part (not exact language). "Able to lift 50 lbs repeatedly and use moving dollies. Requires frequent stair-climbing while moving boxes and furniture. Working conditions include the wearing of face masks working in closed-in spaces with rodents, insects, urine and feces present."

I have no doubt these workers routinely find stacks of porn also, both in print and video.

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 7, 2012 - 5:03pm.

NSR, you really should be MORE concerned with public servants (including your "elected officials") becoming so "insecure" and "power hungry" that they waste ungodly amounts of taxpayer money on "go-nowhere `investigations'" and "`prosecutions'," taking employees off the clock without just cause (and having to pay them anyway for no work done, lol) and otherwise using their "positions" for personal gain.

These things happen all the time but often aren't "publicized."

Submitted by no_such_reality on June 8, 2012 - 5:36am.

June 8, 2012

Oxnard high school teacher accused of 'sexting' student
"An Oxnard high school teacher was arrested on suspicion of "sexting" with a 17-year-old boy at school, police said Thursday afternoon."

In the more stupity and arrogance than malfeasance front.
CORONA: Firefighter’s demotion for thumbs-up upheld
"The State Personnel Board has upheld the demotion of a Cal Fire engineer who took his hands off the steering wheel to flash a “two-thumbs-up” sign to a red-light camera as the fire engine sped through the intersection with its emergency lights and siren on."

and whatever you want to call this...
L.A.'s new housing chief makes $100,000 over federal cap
"Controversy over pay at the L.A. housing authority is reignited with the announcement of a federal cap. But officials say $260,000 base salary won't change."

Submitted by no_such_reality on June 9, 2012 - 7:58am.

June 9, 2012

An update and question on county lack of action.

County didn't test evidence in masturbation case

A co-worker discovered the employee and told investigators he suspected the man was masturbating.

“As JR approached, he heard what sounded like a woman’s moaning and music coming from the employee’s telephone, which he associated with pornographic movies,” the report states. “He saw employee and asked if he was OK.”

There was no explanation provided for why the top button of the man’s pants was unbuttoned.

Commissioner Krauel noted in her report that a nearby trash can contained paper towels with what may have been semen, but the material was never tested

Submitted by harvey on June 9, 2012 - 8:56am.

I enjoy this thread and hope that you continue to maintain it.

...but you can probably leave out a few details on some of the stories.

Submitted by CDMA ENG on June 9, 2012 - 9:04am.

NSR...

For once I am going to line up with BG and CAR on this and say Bullshit!

There are just as many scumbags in the private sector as there are in the public.

Why would you start a flame thread over something that happens everywhere with everybody.

There is no point to this other than to just make public employees look like bad guys.

CE

Submitted by harvey on June 9, 2012 - 9:49am.

CDMA ENG wrote:
There are just as many scumbags in the private sector as there are in the public

You are missing the point.

It's about accountability.

Are there scumbags that work at IBM? Probably. Like you said, there are scumbags everywhere.

What should be done about scumbags at IBM? That's up to IBM. It's a private business, how it is run is a private matter between managers, employees, and shareholders. Unless there are actual criminal laws broken, it's not a matter of public policy.

Public workers are "the government." They work for the public: you, me, everyone. The taxpayers are the "shareholders" - we have a right, and civic obligation - to demand accountability. We have a right to question whether the managers are meeting their fiduciary obligations and are efficiently and effectively providing services we pay for.

That's the very definition of the distinction between "public" and "private."

I understand that this thread is probably not the most meaningful way to seek accountability from the public-sector (it's even a bit petty.) But it's informative in a fun way.

Submitted by no_such_reality on June 9, 2012 - 10:14am.

CD, it's not really about the stupid employees. It's about the handing of the employee's stupidity and the reality of them being just like the scums in the private sector contrary to the meme of the dedicated sacrificing government worker.

It's about the handling of the situations, lack of accountability, inability to discipline, a level of evidence needed to take disciplinary action and the failure of the government to pursue that evidence even though they have a high level of proof.

It's about the perception that it has become so rampant that I feel like I'm reading about it on a daily basis.

Most public employees are good people, doing a good job, there is a subset that isn't. There is a bizarre nothing to see here attitude, circle the wagons, code of silence that they protect the bad apples with the full clot of their unions.

It's coming to an election season, we're going to be bombarded with ads from the Teachers unon saying basically 'protect the children', sadly, I feel like I read an article every week with a teacher preying on children.

Submitted by harvey on June 9, 2012 - 10:38am.

no_such_reality wrote:
It's coming to an election season, we're going to be bombarded with ads from the Teachers unon saying basically 'protect the children', sadly, I feel like I read an article every week with a teacher preying on children.

And that gets to the crux of it.

I understand the point that an arbitrary list of "malfeasance reports" is probably not very meaningful and could be intended just to stir the pot.

The question is whether this information can be used toward any specific policy decision; at the end of the day is this collection of stories useful for voters who want to make an informed decision on a policy change?

Or is this stuff just mud-slinging?

The answer depends upon whether these stories are examples of problems than be corrected with actual policy changes, or whether they are just "stuff that happens everywhere at work."

For me, I think stories that emphasize the sheer magnitude of these incidents is illustrative and useful information. Particularly:

- The widespread practice of unions using their power to prevent necessary corrective actions in the public-sector workplace

- The lack of criminal investigation and prosecution of crimes committed by law enforcement and public officials

These are real issues, and there are real policy changes that can be made to correct them. But first the public needs to be made aware of the extent of the problem. If this thread can contribute in small way to that purpose, then I say it's a good thing.

(But I'd rather not hear about some dude with his pants down.)

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 9, 2012 - 10:37am.

no_such_reality wrote:
CD, it's not really about the stupid employees. It's about the handing of the employee's stupidity and the reality of them being just like the scums in the private sector contrary to the meme of the dedicated sacrificing government worker.

It's about the handling of the situations, lack of accountability, inability to discipline, a level of evidence needed to take disciplinary action and the failure of the government to pursue that evidence even though they have a high level of proof.

It's about the perception that it has become so rampant that I feel like I'm reading about it on a daily basis.

Most public employees are good people, doing a good job, there is a subset that isn't. There is a bizarre nothing to see here attitude, circle the wagons, code of silence that they protect the bad apples with the full clot of their unions.

It's coming to an election season, we're going to be bombarded with ads from the Teachers unon saying basically 'protect the children', sadly, I feel like I read an article every week with a teacher preying on children.

NSR, there are absolutely NO "Rules of Evidence" in Kangaroo Court. The hearing officer (5 cmsrs, each appointed by a County Supervisor) decides the disciplinary and selection cases upon their "gut feeling," the exhibits entered by the parties and their perceived "credibility" of the testimony of the witnesses who were brought in to testify. This "witness" in the public administrator case did not "see" anything and therefore was not a "percipient witness," so was subject to likely impeachment and being made a fool of by the accused's union rep or attorney while on the stand. These types of witnesses are likely to waffle and go south on their departments on the stand and only serve to embarrass them and show the cmsr just how low the dept will stoop to try to remove someone that one of their stupidvisors "has a bone to pick with" or feels "threatened by."

If the department decided to spend big bucks on gathering "evidence" from the paper towels, it would have done them no good. The "subject" is not required to give samples of any bodily fluids and in any case, he wouldn't. He was not being accused of a crime and even if his employer was a law enforcement agency, this is not a criminal action.

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 9, 2012 - 11:10am.

harvey wrote:
no_such_reality wrote:
It's coming to an election season, we're going to be bombarded with ads from the Teachers unon saying basically 'protect the children', sadly, I feel like I read an article every week with a teacher preying on children.

And that gets to the crux of it.

I understand the point that an arbitrary list of "malfeasance reports" is probably not very meaningful and could be intended just to stir the pot.

The question is whether this information can be used toward any specific policy decision; at the end of the day is this collection of stories useful for voters who want to make an informed decision on a policy change?

Or is this stuff just mud-slinging?

The answer depends upon whether these stories are examples of problems than be corrected with actual policy changes, or whether they are just "stuff that happens everywhere at work."

For me, I think stories that emphasize the sheer magnitude of these incidents is illustrative and useful information. Particularly:

- The widespread practice of unions using their power to prevent necessary corrective actions in the public-sector workplace

- The lack of criminal investigation and prosecution of crimes committed by law enforcement and public officials

These are real issues, and there are real policy changes that can be made to correct them. But first the public needs to be made aware of the extent of the problem. If this thread can contribute in small way to that purpose, then I say it's a good thing.

(But I'd rather not hear about some dude with his pants down.)

Yes, most of it is "mud slinging." Public employees seem to be the current target for the MSM's drivel. In the private sector where there are no unions, an employee who they "suspected" of doing this will just be walked out, given severance in exchange for a release and not even be given a reason for their discharge. That will never come out because 99% of the time, the employee desperately needs the severance and the employer's perfunctory telephone or letter "recommendation" and so can't take the matter any further.

The difference is, in the private sector, the employer would believe their "stupidvisor" who is beholden to them and even has possibly been with the firm since it was created. But the "real" reason for discharge will just be the stupidvisor's envy of the employee or feeling "threatened" by his/her superior knowledge and skills or remembering that that employee made cheerleader over them in HS or the church choir soprano over them last year. ROTHALYAO, all of this has happened!

Those private sector employees who were coerced by their employers NOT to sign union cards when they had the opportunity sold themselves down the river, IMO. They may as well be working in a "right to work" state.

The unions are there, in part, to prevent unfair, malicious and discriminatory treatment in the workplace of its members. If departments and agencies actually have the documentation and witnesses to prove their charges against the employee, they WIN! But if they're just trying to get rid of someone currently on the bad side of one or more of their lackeys and/or "coddled old-timers," they LOSE.

Regarding criminal "investigations" and subsequent charges against local public officials and employees, the VAST MAJORITY of them have never been prosecuted (wisely, by the DA) or the defendants have been acquitted by a jury. IMO, these "witch hunts" are the absolute biggest waste of taxpayer money on the planet and the defendants end up having the "last laugh" when they sue the prosecuting agencies and win an award for their attorney's fees (paid by taxpayers). More often than not, the "trumped-up charges" were originally "instigated" by a "political rival" of the defendant with a chip on their shoulder as heavy as a boulder :=[

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 9, 2012 - 2:54pm.

The county PA employee mentioned in the UT story was represented at his CSC Rule VII hearing by Bradley K. Moores, Esq.

http://www.gordonrees.com/lawyers/lawyer...

http://members.calbar.ca.gov/fal/Member/...

Mr Moores seems to have "employment law" experience with some state tribunals and the EEOC but I have no idea why he put his client on the stand to admit to taking a call from his spouse while on duty and then becoming "aroused" and turning on his cell phone to video to view porn on the job. The department's "star witness" obviously didn't know any of this and wasn't very credible to the commissioner. She stated in her report (vis a vis) that she wouldn't have even upheld the 90-day suspension had it not been for the employee's own admissions in his testimony that he was viewing porn on the clock!

I've read that this particular classification is NOT unionized and I don't really know if it is or isn't. However, I can't imagine a union rep putting their own "client" on the stand to make those admissions in there!

Without listening to the testimony, we have no idea why Moores decided to do this. It is possible he did it in rebuttal because he believed the department's witness' testimony might be considered to be too damaging to his client and didn't want to let it go.

Interesting case, NSR. Thanks for sharing. Don't really care about the sex - just the principle.

Submitted by flu on June 15, 2012 - 8:39am.

Got porn?

Students watched porn in 7th grade class
Classmates say they reported goings-on, and teacher did nothing

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2012/jun/...

The irony to this is the district was really hush hush about this up until a few days ago.. A previous article mentioned the school suspended 9 students but school officials declined to state why.. Now we know why they didn't want to talk about it... I don't know, a bunch of kids wacking off in a classroom, you think maybe just maybe there might be a problem???

You know there seems to be rampant case of what I call "porn stupidity" that seems to be making news. I mean, people getting caught with porn at work.. I don't get it. In every company that I've worked at, it was very very clear... No porn at work, no porn even on work computer even if you are working at home... If you get caught, bye bye, immediate termination.... Why on earth would anyone in their right mind think it would be porn would be OK at work? Are people really that dumb?

Submitted by spdrun on June 15, 2012 - 8:39am.

7th grade students have one thing on their minds ... news at 11.

Submitted by flu on June 15, 2012 - 8:43am.

spdrun wrote:
7th grade students have one thing on their minds ... news at 11.

No, but having a union protect a teacher that obviously didn't do his job sitting at his desk while 7th graders wacked off in public in plain site, yeah no problem there... And he probably gets to keep his job...and his pension for that matter.
Gotta love unions!

Guess you think it's ok just just jerk off in public.

Submitted by svelte on June 15, 2012 - 6:14pm.

Not sure what the point of this thread is as any place that has employees, private or public, will have some of them do improper things from time to time. That's just a given.

But while we are on the topic, here's an interesting one:

http://www.10news.com/news/31194216/deta...


OAKLAND, Calif. -- An Alameda County judge has been charged with elder theft for allegedly stealing at least $1.6 million from his 97-year-old neighbor.

Paul Seeman was arrested and charged Thursday with one count of elder theft and 11 counts of perjury. He was being held on $525,000 bail.

Authorities said Seeman began stealing from Anne Nutting, his neighbor, in 1999 after her husband died.
Seeman is accused of slowly bleeding her assets until April 2010 when she died at the age of 97.
Nutting didn't have any family when she died.

Police said the 57-year-old Seeman became Nutting's durable power of attorney and claimed he found $1 million worth of stock certificates and dividend checks in her house.

Seeman was appointed to the bench in 2009 by former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Submitted by CDMA ENG on June 15, 2012 - 7:03pm.

harvey wrote:
CDMA ENG wrote:
There are just as many scumbags in the private sector as there are in the public

You are missing the point.

It's about accountability.

Are there scumbags that work at IBM? Probably. Like you said, there are scumbags everywhere.

What should be done about scumbags at IBM? That's up to IBM. It's a private business, how it is run is a private matter between managers, employees, and shareholders. Unless there are actual criminal laws broken, it's not a matter of public policy.

Public workers are "the government." They work for the public: you, me, everyone. The taxpayers are the "shareholders" - we have a right, and civic obligation - to demand accountability. We have a right to question whether the managers are meeting their fiduciary obligations and are efficiently and effectively providing services we pay for.

That's the very definition of the distinction between "public" and "private."

I understand that this thread is probably not the most meaningful way to seek accountability from the public-sector (it's even a bit petty.) But it's informative in a fun way.

Please... Plenty of laws have been broken in the private sector as well...

Best way to commit a crime in this country is to be white... white collared... and the bigger the fraud the less likely you will be convicted.

Makes no difference private or public.

As the Human Torch says... Flame on! And the smarter in the group will ignore this thread as it deserves to be...

CE

Submitted by spdrun on June 15, 2012 - 7:24pm.

No, but having a union protect a teacher that obviously didn't do his job sitting at his desk while 7th graders wacked off in public in plain site, yeah no problem there... And he probably gets to keep his job...and his pension for that matter.
Gotta love unions!

Guess you think it's ok just just jerk off in public.

Hell no, I don't condone it. But I also recognize that 7th graders are both randy and adept at hiding contraband from adults. Having been one myself not so long ago :)

Submitted by svelte on June 15, 2012 - 7:24pm.

harvey wrote:

You are missing the point.

It's about accountability.

Are there scumbags that work at IBM? Probably. Like you said, there are scumbags everywhere.

What should be done about scumbags at IBM? That's up to IBM. It's a private business, how it is run is a private matter between managers, employees, and shareholders. Unless there are actual criminal laws broken, it's not a matter of public policy.

Public workers are "the government." They work for the public: you, me, everyone. The taxpayers are the "shareholders" - we have a right, and civic obligation - to demand accountability.

I get it now.

Okay, anyone on here who owns shares in a private company - please feel free to post misdeeds done by employees of that company in this thread too!

Let's hold those companies accountable also!

Submitted by svelte on June 15, 2012 - 7:29pm.

One of my mutual funds holds Sears stock.

An article I ran across today...damn you Sears!!

http://news.yahoo.com/more-women-were-li...


Female customers who shopped at a Sears store in North Hollywood, Calif., over the past three years may have been videotaped in the dressing rooms and restrooms, according to an attorney representing 25 women suing the retail chain.

The group is suing Sears and a former maintenance worker who allegedly videotaped them from 2009 to April 2012.

Michael Alder, the attorney for the plaintiffs, said an unknown number of female customers were also likely videotaped in the store during that period....

Submitted by scaredyclassic on June 15, 2012 - 7:40pm.

Did people used to get terminated for possessing pornographic magazines at work prior to the Internet.

Can't people just call up a few mental images if they cannot make it 8 hours without sexual imagery. Jeez Louise. A paucity of imagination.

Submitted by CA renter on June 15, 2012 - 11:51pm.

CDMA ENG wrote:
harvey wrote:
CDMA ENG wrote:
There are just as many scumbags in the private sector as there are in the public

You are missing the point.

It's about accountability.

Are there scumbags that work at IBM? Probably. Like you said, there are scumbags everywhere.

What should be done about scumbags at IBM? That's up to IBM. It's a private business, how it is run is a private matter between managers, employees, and shareholders. Unless there are actual criminal laws broken, it's not a matter of public policy.

Public workers are "the government." They work for the public: you, me, everyone. The taxpayers are the "shareholders" - we have a right, and civic obligation - to demand accountability. We have a right to question whether the managers are meeting their fiduciary obligations and are efficiently and effectively providing services we pay for.

That's the very definition of the distinction between "public" and "private."

I understand that this thread is probably not the most meaningful way to seek accountability from the public-sector (it's even a bit petty.) But it's informative in a fun way.

Please... Plenty of laws have been broken in the private sector as well...

Best way to commit a crime in this country is to be white... white collared... and the bigger the fraud the less likely you will be convicted.

Makes no difference private or public.

As the Human Torch says... Flame on! And the smarter in the group will ignore this thread as it deserves to be...

CE

Totally agree with you, CE.
-----------------

Pri,

You really don't seem to understand the relationship between taxpayers and govt employees. Taxpayers are *consumers,* not shareholders or employers. Government employees are accountable to their employers -- the agencies they work for -- and the bosses/politicians who oversee them.

Businesses are only accountable to their customers(in the sense that you intend) to the extent that their customers have the right to buy or not buy their products. In the U.S., with the exception of federal taxes, you get to choose which taxes you prefer to pay. Some states have no income tax, some have no sales tax, some have very low property taxes, etc. You can choose to "buy" residency in a state/county/city -- and pay the price quoted -- or you can choose to move to another state/county/city that has tax laws you find more favorable. It is more of a "free market" than you'd like to admit.

The politicians ARE accountable to the public/voters, but unelected public employees are no more accountable to taxpayers than an employee in a private company is accountable to that company's customers. Yes, you can get into trouble if you piss off a customer, but the customer is not the employee's boss/employer.

Submitted by no_such_reality on June 16, 2012 - 7:49am.

Thank you CAR for being clear for everyone.

The government workers do not think they are accountable to the taxpayer.

If the taxpayer doesnt like it, get out of the State is their position.

Submitted by bearishgurl on June 16, 2012 - 12:11pm.

no_such_reality wrote:
Thank you CAR for being clear for everyone.

The government workers do not think they are accountable to the taxpayer.

If the taxpayer doesnt like it, get out of the State is their position.

The REAL situation is, govm't employees have a "monopoly" on the services they are providing. No one else does it and the taxpayer cannot visit a private business to get a certified copy of a document, for example, unless that business is simply a "middleman" who must visit the gov't agency themselves to provide the service (such as a DMV "tag office" or "runner").

ALL of the "services" govm't employees are providing MUST be provided by law, no matter what anyone who doesn't receive or doesn't qualify to receive the service may think about it. The working conditions inherent in providing many of these public services may or may not be what a typical worker in private enterprise CAN or WILL agree to comply with for the duration of their employment.

Therefore, the "taxpayer" (in ANY jurisdiction) has no choice but to use the gov'mt agency if they need services only it provides. There is no "shopping around."

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