PopCorn Ceiling Removal and Retexture

User Forum Topic
Submitted by SDisGreat on October 17, 2011 - 6:32am

Hello Piggs,

I m looking for any recommendations on any contractors who remove popcorn ceiling. My home is under 2000 sq ft single story and I think it's time to get with the times.

Thanks

Submitted by jpinpb on October 17, 2011 - 7:38am.

I hope you don't mind I linked this to the contractors thread. Hopefully we can get a name of someone who is good at this.

Submitted by UCGal on October 17, 2011 - 8:32am.

What is the age of the home?
If it's older - you need to test it for asbestos. Homes from the 60's and 70's often had asbestos in the popcorn ceiling. This adds *significantly* to the cost.

If the house is older, you can buy a test kit at Home Depot -scrape a little and mail it off.

Submitted by ljinvestor on October 17, 2011 - 9:17am.

I've used Mr D's painting before to do that. Reasonable price,good work, quick, and can do other stuff if needed. Contact info at www.mrdspainting.com

Submitted by Fearful on October 17, 2011 - 10:33am.

UCGal wrote:
What is the age of the home?
If it's older - you need to test it for asbestos. Homes from the 60's and 70's often had asbestos in the popcorn ceiling. This adds *significantly* to the cost.

If the house is older, you can buy a test kit at Home Depot -scrape a little and mail it off.


I may get scorched for this, but: If you discover your ceiling contains asbestos, you have gained information you really could have done without. Do it yourself or find a contractor that wants to be paid cash and does not mention the a-word. If you discover it has asbestos in it, you are then obliged to disclose that to the contractors and to subsequent buyers. Do yourself a favor: Ignorance is bliss.

You get the stuff off by wetting, scraping, and putting it into plastic bags, whereupon it quietly disappears back to the ground from whence it came.

You'll probably have to sand a little bit; do so with a vacuum sander, wear at least a nuisance dust mask, and ventilate the house well.

You probably will have to have a drywall guy re-tape some of the seams. One motivation for sprayed-on ceilings is the shoddy work they hide.

One alternative, though it is not at all cheap, is to cover the popcorn ceiling with a 1/4" drywall layer, thereby entombing the suspected nasty stuff.

Submitted by UCGal on October 17, 2011 - 11:27am.

Fearful wrote:
UCGal wrote:
What is the age of the home?
If it's older - you need to test it for asbestos. Homes from the 60's and 70's often had asbestos in the popcorn ceiling. This adds *significantly* to the cost.

If the house is older, you can buy a test kit at Home Depot -scrape a little and mail it off.


I may get scorched for this, but: If you discover your ceiling contains asbestos, you have gained information you really could have done without. Do it yourself or find a contractor that wants to be paid cash and does not mention the a-word. If you discover it has asbestos in it, you are then obliged to disclose that to the contractors and to subsequent buyers. Do yourself a favor: Ignorance is bliss.

You get the stuff off by wetting, scraping, and putting it into plastic bags, whereupon it quietly disappears back to the ground from whence it came.

You'll probably have to sand a little bit; do so with a vacuum sander, wear at least a nuisance dust mask, and ventilate the house well.

You probably will have to have a drywall guy re-tape some of the seams. One motivation for sprayed-on ceilings is the shoddy work they hide.

One alternative, though it is not at all cheap, is to cover the popcorn ceiling with a 1/4" drywall layer, thereby entombing the suspected nasty stuff.

I agree it's not a bad DIY job - but do you want to risk asbestosis if there is asbestis in it? I don't. But the risk is relatively easily mitigated with filter masks and containment of the debris from the rest of the house.

Also there's the fact that it is illegal to put asbestos in the regular landfill.

When we looked into DYI we found that there are few disposal sites - and only contractors have access to them. So you'd need to hire a contractor to dispose of it - even if you did the scraping.

Here's a list of EPA approved sites that accept asbestos
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=we...

Hopefully the OP has a newer house and it's a non-issue.

Submitted by sdduuuude on October 17, 2011 - 12:26pm.

Easy but messy do-it-yourself job.

Just spray the ceiling w/ lots of water, wait a while and scrape with a big, fat putty knife. Done.

Just for fun, try it in a closet - you'll see how easy it is. Most of your time/work will be spent moving or covering furniture and cleaning up the mess.

If you do have asbestos, I wouldn't worry about it (but that's just me) because when you spray the ceiling the asbestos won't get airborne because of the water.

Submitted by Fearful on October 17, 2011 - 12:39pm.

UCGal wrote:

I agree it's not a bad DIY job - but do you want to risk asbestosis if there is asbestis in it? I don't. But the risk is relatively easily mitigated with filter masks and containment of the debris from the rest of the house.

Also there's the fact that it is illegal to put asbestos in the regular landfill.


Boy I'm really gonna get torched for this one, but: If you don't have any reason to believe there is any asbestos in your ceiling scrapings, just put the stuff in trash bags in your regular curbside pickup. It'll go to a landfill where it will be buried under a mountain of other trash and dirt and no one will ever, ever get asbestosis from it.

A whiff of asbestos particles will not give you asbestosis, just like smoking a few cigarettes will not give you lung cancer. Truth be told, both might kill you, but both are low probability. Work with asbestos or smoke regularly and you are taking a real chance. It's hard to imagine just how many people worked regularly with asbestos for many years, sanding and scraping the stuff daily. The stuff ain't cyanide. Personally I would rather risk a day's worth of exposure to asbestos than go through the headaches and expense of hiring an asbestos mitigation contractor. But everyone chooses their own risk.

I speed regularly, but I don't smoke, and I wear ear plugs when sawing tile. I also use a wet saw, and it sickens me to see hardscape contractors using dry diamond saws to cut concrete bricks. You know how much nice, fine silica dust is thrown into the air from a dry diamond saw? Silicosis, anyone? Cough, cough.

Submitted by Blogstar on October 17, 2011 - 12:45pm.

Do what dude said.
Tape cheap painters plastic to all walls about a foot down from the cieling.Make a bag of the whole room. When the room is not too hot go into the bag with a mask and hood and junk clothes and scrape the stuff off or get someone to do it.Have a sponge and a bucket of water to wipe the ceiling clean of residue. Roll up the bag and get rid of the hood,mask, sponge and clothes too. There is no mess beyond that.

I am not saying to do that if asbestos is present, or might be present, but I would.

Submitted by CA renter on October 17, 2011 - 9:44pm.

We're right in the middle of getting the popcorn texture removed. Larry the drywall guy is doing it for us.

Here's his info:

Larry at (760) 622-8062

Our house is under 2,000 sf, and will run between $1,500 and $2,000.

Submitted by yooklid on October 18, 2011 - 4:54pm.

Nuke it from orbit.

Only way to be sure.

Submitted by EconProf on October 18, 2011 - 6:01pm.

The consensus here seems to be do-it-yourself or hire someone to scrape and dispose of it without following all the rules of the government and scaremongers. I agree, and have done it several times on rental properties. We all , need to properly evaluate true risk and probabilities in our decision-making and not be overly influenced by vivid, spectacular, but unlikely events. Don't worry about the tiny amount of asbestoes in popcorn ceilings, or second-hand smoke, or throwing away flourescent bulbs, but do put on your seatbelt, eat sensibly, and don't tailgate.

Submitted by protorio on October 19, 2011 - 8:07am.

Why not just wait until popcorn ceilings become fashionable again?

I'm sure that sometime in the 2030s, 1980s pastels, white kitchen tile, and oak 'n brass will be all the rage with currently rugrat hipsters.

Submitted by enron_by_the_sea on October 19, 2011 - 5:54pm.

Can someone educate me on why there is this drive to get popcorn ceilings removed? Why does everyone hate them? Aesthetics?

Submitted by scaredyclassic on October 19, 2011 - 7:38pm.

I usually put on my seatbelt but sometimes I just say fuck it. I can't explain.

I always eat sensibly.

I never tailgate.

I never snort asbestos particles knowingly ...

Anything else I shouldn't do?

Submitted by scaredyclassic on October 19, 2011 - 7:40pm.

Hmm. Get enough sleep.

Poop regularly.

Do squats.

Submitted by equalizer on October 19, 2011 - 8:48pm.

EconProf wrote:
The consensus here seems to be do-it-yourself or hire someone to scrape and dispose of it without following all the rules of the government and scaremongers. I agree, and have done it several times on rental properties. We all , need to properly evaluate true risk and probabilities in our decision-making and not be overly influenced by vivid, spectacular, but unlikely events. Don't worry about the tiny amount of asbestoes in popcorn ceilings, or second-hand smoke, or throwing away flourescent bulbs, but do put on your seatbelt, eat sensibly, and don't tailgate.

Home Depot recycles compact fluorescent at return counter, but your main point taken.

It’s too bad MBS market ignored the so-called unlikely Black Swan events! It did seem unlikely for the guys sitting in front of their Bloomberg terminals since we didn't have national home sales decline for 50+ years, but a weeks’ worth of paperwork review in the trenches would have easily uncovered that likelihood of problems was much greater than 1%.

Submitted by svelte on October 19, 2011 - 9:00pm.

Geez. You all would probably crap your pants if you saw how I live life...

Submitted by Fearful on October 19, 2011 - 9:08pm.

enron_by_the_sea wrote:
Can someone educate me on why there is this drive to get popcorn ceilings removed? Why does everyone hate them? Aesthetics?

Mostly just aesthetics. They are visually busy, where the eye wants to see the smoothness of sky, and they can't be cleaned. If you bump or mar it, it dings easily and can't be repaired, and crumbly white stuff falls to the floor and causes the dust mites living in the carpet to develop asbestosis.

Submitted by Fearful on October 19, 2011 - 9:12pm.

walterwhite wrote:

I never snort asbestos particles knowingly ...

When I removed an in-wall flue from my 1940's era house, it was made of this funny gray fibrous stuff. Just to freak out my wife, I held it up to my face and inhaled deeply.

Then I chased her around the house with it, intoning "EEEEEVIL! EEEEEVIL!"

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.