OT: Finding jobs in San Diego UPDATE

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Submitted by Former SD resident on February 2, 2011 - 11:31am

We are looking to move back to San Diego, and of course we won’t do that until my husband has a job. He is currently a VP of product management at a large bank on the east coast. We’ve seen a few postings for jobs in his area but not many. Do you think recruiters might have more access to these types of jobs or are regular search means better? We’ve never used a recruiter but with the current job market I didn’t know if they would be more helpful.

Submitted by UCGal on February 2, 2011 - 12:26pm.

I was going to suggest Craigslist until I saw the caliber of job. My husband (commercial architect) has found more job leads on craigslist than on monster or other job boards. But I don't think the same is true for executive positions.

Perhaps Davelj can chime in, since I think he works at that level in banking.

Personal pet peeve of mine... Why do they call financial instruments "products". They aren't manufactured. When derivitives are referred to as "products" it makes them see more tangible than they are... But that's just my personal issue.

Submitted by SK in CV on February 2, 2011 - 3:23pm.

Craigslist has some banking jobs. Probably better is indeed.com. Not sure exactly how they do it, but they seem to have jobs posted, with links, from just about all the other executive job boards like monster. One stop shop for all the boards.

Some industries use recruiters heavily. Just guessing, but I suspect banking is currently not one of them. If I'm correct, recruiters will have access to the same jobs that the executive boards have.

Submitted by carli on February 2, 2011 - 5:10pm.

I assume you've researched it and found that a job similar to your husband's current one exists at banks operating in San Diego. In other words, are you sure that there is a counterpart position at a bank here in San Diego? Frequently, product management is done at a corporate or headquarters location, but maybe there's a good VP level product position at midsize or smaller local banks here in SD that he'd be happy with?

The reason I ask is that I know from personal experience that a similar position to the one I had in NYC (sr mgmt in sales/mktg for a healthcare company) does not exist here even though there are similar companies. In moving to the west coast, I found that there would only be a counterpart position in either the LA or San Fran locatons of similar companies, but definitely not in San Diego.

Good luck to you!

Submitted by XBoxBoy on February 2, 2011 - 5:48pm.

Although I'm in a technical field instead of banking, I've used recruiters both to find a job and to find employees. For the better part my experience has been good. However, one important thing.

When dealing with recruiters it's important to keep in mind there are three sets of interests. The company hiring, yours and the recruiters. These three sets of interests are not the same, and you still need to look out for your own interests.

It's really pretty much like buying a house with a real estate agent who is acting as both the sellers and the buyers agent. They are going to be more interested in getting the deal done than in getting you the best job for you, or the best salary or whatever your interests are.

With that warning firmly in mind, I still think recruiters are often worthwhile.

XBoxBoy

ps. If you do use a recruiter, be sure to explicitly discuss whether or not you are free to be looking via other methods. Some recruiters expect exclusivity, or don't want you sending out your resume to lots of places. All that's fine, just discuss it before you hook up with someone so you are clear about this.

Submitted by carli on February 2, 2011 - 6:16pm.

Maybe things have changed in the days since I was in contact with recruiters, but in my experience, recruiters are paid by the company doing the hiring and therefore definitely have the company's best interests in mind. Of course, they need to entice topnotch candidates so they'll be trying to cultivate good relationships with attractive candidates, but they are not working for the candidate, they're working for the company.

But, maybe things have changed dramatically in the last few years with the economic downturn...are you saying that there are recruiters out there who are hired by jobseekers?

Submitted by paramount on February 2, 2011 - 8:24pm.

I'm in a tech field and do not waste any time with 3rd party recruiters.

One thing to keep in mind: California in general has a *VERY* competitive job market even during good times.

Submitted by flu on February 2, 2011 - 8:47pm.

If he's a VP or director, his best option is to work though his own network of people he knows, rather than to be recruited through a recruiter... Director and higher positions here in S.D. are much more effective by referral basis. I know a few former director + vp level positions who's been out of work in S.D. for 8+ months..Not exactly easy to apply to a comparable position through traditional means.

Submitted by abell on February 2, 2011 - 8:49pm.

My husband (in accounting, not banking) used to use recruiters for his level of accounting. But do the economic downturn, he found that recruiters were no longer getting jobs at his level and looking on job boards was more effective. So it just depends. If you have a recruiter that doesn't mind you sending out your own resumes as well, then I think you can go both ways. Also with the recruiter, if you are sending out your own resumes, you may want to approve any job the recruiter wants you to apply for, that way the same company won't get two resumes if they are advertising on their own as well.

Submitted by paramount on February 2, 2011 - 8:54pm.

For some reason I was always under the impression that nearly everyone who works at a bank was a VP...

Submitted by CDMA ENG on February 2, 2011 - 9:01pm.

UCGal wrote:
I was going to suggest Craigslist until I saw the caliber of job. My husband (commercial architect) has found more job leads on craigslist than on monster or other job boards. But I don't think the same is true for executive positions.

I never would have guessed that. Pretty neat.

CE

Submitted by Diego Mamani on February 2, 2011 - 9:10pm.

I totally agree with Paramount. I think pretty much everybody in banking is a VP. It's probably the equivalent of manager, or at best senior manager, in other industries. I've heard of fresh MBAs with no banking experience being VPs in banking.

Going back to the OP. My advice is to search on your own for a few days using the online tools people have suggested here. If nothing happens, then, by all means call a recruiter. But tell the recruiter up front whether you intend to send applications on your own, and also whether you want him/her to let you know before sending your info to a particular employer.

Also consider unorthodox sources. I'm in the science/research field, and back in the late 90s I was living in L.A. when it occurred to me to look at the wanted listings in the L.A. Times on a Sunday. To my surprise, there was exactly one opening for my field in San Diego! I couldn't believe it! The advertised salary range was too low, but I applied anyways, and got the job (and negotiated a better pay). My colleagues couldn't believe I got that job through the newspaper!

Submitted by ljinvestor on February 2, 2011 - 9:11pm.

VP of product management isn't too specific. What products does he manage? Cds, Annuities, Mutual Funds, Insurance, Alternative Investments, or does it have to do with other products?

In this market its more about networking than recruiters or job boards

Submitted by Former SD resident on February 3, 2011 - 7:13am.

Thanks to those who responded. Paramount you are correct there are a lot of VP's at Banks, he is not considered an executive but more like senior management, he does present his ideas for product development to executives. Also, he does not really management financial instruments. He runs the development of all their on-line lended products. Before he came to this bank they did not have much of an online presents, now they do. He designs everything on how a "product" will work online. He understands how the business needs a product to work and also how to work with programmers.

We know there are not really any banks he can work at in SD. We did find one position at a bank that was similar, but it would have been a little step down and in the job description it actually said to "monitor employee breaks" which he definitly does not what to do. He is open to working at data companies, really anything having to do with data products.

We are looking at San Francisco too, but would really love to be back in SD as that's where we both grew up and now that we have children we would like to be close to family again. Are looking at LA, but we both don't really like it and would only move there for the perfect job. Thanks again for your help.

Submitted by flu on February 3, 2011 - 7:39am.

Former SD resident wrote:
Thanks to those who responded. Paramount you are correct there are a lot of VP's at Banks, he is not considered an executive but more like senior management, he does present his ideas for product development to executives. Also, he does not really management financial instruments. He runs the development of all their on-line lended products. Before he came to this bank they did not have much of an online presents, now they do. He designs everything on how a "product" will work online. He understands how the business needs a product to work and also how to work with programmers.

We know there are not really any banks he can work at in SD. We did find one position at a bank that was similar, but it would have been a little step down and in the job description it actually said to "monitor employee breaks" which he definitly does not what to do. He is open to working at data companies, really anything having to do with data products.

We are looking at San Francisco too, but would really love to be back in SD as that's where we both grew up and now that we have children we would like to be close to family again. Are looking at LA, but we both don't really like it and would only move there for the perfect job. Thanks again for your help.

My advice to your hubby....Unless he already has his connections here in S.D. and his reputation already preceeds him, I would recommend S.F./bay area over S.D. at this current state. With all due respect, the fact that he is looking at recruiting sites/etc tells me he doesn't know people down here...

All the indicators are that the silicon valley is ramping up again...If he plans on establishing himself, I'd start there, because there is much more opportunities up there imho..You pay for it with higher living costs...But, you also have much more opportunities...So, if he is going to spend his time building his reputation, might as well do it in the bay area.

I can't speak for banking industry, but regarding anything related to tech and I.T. down in San Diego, things sort of work like a fraternity almost because the community is really tiny down here...There's the traditional hotjobs/dice/monster application process. Then there's the "frat" thing in which you know someone who knows someone who opens a position specifically to accomodate someone, and that's more so director level and above (for pure techies that's senior principals or architects and above).

If I was going to relocate to C.A. (or if I was going to start over), I'd be in the Bay Area now.

There were times that in the past I felt moving from SF to SD was the worst career decision in my life....In fact, there are still times that I feel this way too, because relative to where I was or could have been, versus now...significant difference...Not to mention, I end up traveling up there all the time anyway....The "startup" spirit just isn't in san diego currently imho...(at least not for tech)...And since it sounds like you/him don't really have plans to start a self-run business, it probablye would be difficult for him to find a comparable position in S.D... (Like I said, i know probably at least a dozen or so "real" directors and vp's that have not been able to find anything comparable for 8+ months...They aren't even being considered for lower, hands-on positions, because people think they are "over-qualified") And the prevailing wind that is blowning in the tech field is companies that are hiring are looking for hands-on techie grunts, NOT outside managers....

If you and him are really infactuated by S.D., go to the bay area, make a killing up there, and contact SDR or sdrealtor to buy a vacation home down here...It's just an 1hr flight to and from...

Submitted by Former SD resident on February 3, 2011 - 10:31am.

Thanks Flu. He is not looking at recruiters I am asking about them because I was curious what everyone's opinion was on them, if they were helpful. I was trying to look for a persuasive argument if you all thought they might be helpful. He does have some contacts still in SD at smaller data type companies that he has been in contact with. It's just a matter of finding the right job and of course the right pay.

As for his reputation, I would say it's pretty good. He wasn't really looking for a job when his current employer contacted him. We had been considering leaving SD at the time to start a family and buy a house (we wouldn't buy at 05-06 prices) and the company offered him a deal we couldn't pass up. He just put his resume out on Tuesday and has already had a few banks contact him, but there in the mid-west.

I'm the one that really what's to move back to SD, but am open to San Fran too, I love the city but again we'd be moving somewhere where we won't know anyone again, but at least it a short flight down instead of cross country.

Submitted by paramount on February 3, 2011 - 9:16pm.

As most of us know, it's easy to easier to leave San Diego than it is to return (at least with a job).

Submitted by paramount on February 4, 2011 - 12:51am.

Silicon Valley
Record bankruptcies

In California, the San Jose Mercury News reported Friday (Jan 14), that bankruptcies in San Jose hit an all-time high last year, as 13,366 people and businesses were "overwhelmed by debts for the third year of the Great Recession."

Said the Mercury in Debt Filings at Record Level, the flood of filing is a 16 percent jump over 2009.
California bankruptcies were up 25 percent from a year earlier, according to the American Bankruptcy Institute. Nationally, the number of bankruptcies was up 9 percent over 2009, with 1,530,078 in 2010 compared with 1,407,788 the year before.
Wayne Silver, whose practice is mainly referrals of complex bankruptcy cases and fraud, told the Mercury: “I have never been as busy in my life, including the 1980s savings and loan scandal and the dot-com years.”

Submitted by Former SD resident on November 9, 2012 - 1:17pm.

Almost 2 years later my husband has found a great job in LA. We put our house on the market and within 2 days had a bidding war and a contract over ask! Couldn't have dreamed of a better response to our home especially here in North Carolina where the market is still soft. So now we are on our way to LA county. Does anyone know of a good Piggington type site where I can get info on the LA/North OC housing market? and yes we plan to rent while we decide where we want to ultimately land. Also, heard there are a lot of scams on craigslist for rentals, does anyone know a good site to look for home rentals? Thanks

Submitted by Diego Mamani on November 9, 2012 - 1:35pm.

Congratulations!
I don't know about a Pig-type website for El Lay, but this site has great advice on schools, neighborhoods, etc.:
http://www.city-data.com/

As for finding a rental, if you want a SFH, I suggest you go with a realtor. I think the best properties are listed on the MLS.

Welcome back, and good luck!

Submitted by FormerSanDiegan on November 9, 2012 - 2:25pm.

One major source for Rentals is Westside Rentals: westsiderentals.com

You have to pay 50 bucks or something. I found it useful in researching rentals in LA when we were looking about 7 years ago.

As you might suspect, commutes in LA can be a nightmare. A 10-mile drive in San Diego is nothing like a 10-mile drive in some parts of LA.

I think there are enough contributors to this board who live in LA that you should post your questions here (maybe you already have).

Submitted by no_such_reality on November 9, 2012 - 2:35pm.

Indeed is nice for a reactive screening.

Linkedin is nice for extending his network.

But at the VP level, it's about the network. The recruiters may or may not be busy, but even they will be network. When they've got the job, then you need to be fresh in their networking mind. With Recruiters, you match or you don't.

For the job he wants, I'd suggest id the firms, and start working the network.

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