Local Non-Census Employment Rises Yet Again

Submitted by Rich Toscano on July 21, 2010 - 3:04pm
Total San Diego employment dropped between May and June -- but the decline was caused by the mass laying off of temporary US Census workers who had previously been swelling the ranks of the employed. 



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Submitted by FormerSanDiegan on July 21, 2010 - 4:02pm.

I guess those entities adding these jobs did not receive the memo that we are headed for a double dip.

Submitted by moneymaker on July 22, 2010 - 7:22am.

SDG&E's meter readers are probably going to be joining those census workers in the next 18 months. I'm not saying this is a bad thing overall for the economy as we will now be more efficient as a society, but what if the postal workers were to join them in the future. See where this might be heading. The human factor is decreasing as the gap between the rich and poor widens.

Submitted by afx114 on July 22, 2010 - 9:01am.

threadkiller wrote:
SDG&E's meter readers are probably going to be joining those census workers in the next 18 months. I'm not saying this is a bad thing overall for the economy as we will now be more efficient as a society, but what if the postal workers were to join them in the future. See where this might be heading. The human factor is decreasing as the gap between the rich and poor widens.

From http://www.sdge.com/smartmeter/faq.shtml:

There are no layoffs planned. Employees currently working as meter readers will be offered other job opportunities and training within SDG&E. Although a meter reader will no longer be reading the meter, SDG&E will still need to have access to your meters for safety and regular maintenance.

Submitted by JC on July 23, 2010 - 4:50pm.

This week - Editor's Roundtable. Local Unemployment Continues to Rise. Did anyone get a chance to listen to this? http://www.kpbs.org/news/2010/jul/23/loc...

Submitted by jpinpb on July 23, 2010 - 8:09pm.

Thanks for posting, JC.

When she says, "people are tending to save more," some people just flat don't have the money to spend. I think even those living for free are starting to curb their spending and adjusting.

And of course, these numbers don't reflect the underemployed.

I was at Cafe Athena the other day. I was talking to one of the busboys that has worked there easily for the last 15 years. He said they cut his hours to 4 hours a week.

Plus, in May, General Dynamics NASSCO was preparing to cut as many as 1,150 jobs in San Diego County.

The defense contractor sent letters to 900 of its 4,100 workers, notifying them that they might be laid off as early as mid-July. About half of the 500 jobs held by subcontractors also might be cut.

Well, last week NASSCO, announced layoffs of about 300 workers and 270 subcontractors. Those people get paid some decent money.

Submitted by AN on July 23, 2010 - 10:54pm.

To balance out the layoffs jpinpb mentioned, Motorola is moving their headquarter here to San Diego start January next year. I don't know exactly how many people they'll hire, but I'm pretty sure not everyone from their Schaumburg head quarter is moving. Rumor is they'll be hiring a lot here.

Submitted by JC on July 24, 2010 - 8:34am.

Hi there. I was in a hurry when I was posting and I've been working too much lately to read as much as I would like. I was just curious about the different takes on local employment by what I consider two very good sources. Probably missing something fairly obvious....:)

Submitted by peterh on July 24, 2010 - 9:13am.

I'm just wondering what industries the jobs are coming from, what companies are hiring and what the pay rates are? Low paying hotel, tourist, restaurant, etc. jobs cannot hope to keep this high priced real estate market afloat even at current reduced prices. Are there many high paying jobs being created? Anyone with any information on these topics please post.

Submitted by Rich Toscano on July 24, 2010 - 3:58pm.

JC wrote:
Hi there. I was in a hurry when I was posting and I've been working too much lately to read as much as I would like. I was just curious about the different takes on local employment by what I consider two very good sources. Probably missing something fairly obvious....:)

Two things, probably. First the census (employment fell if you count it). Second, unemployment and employment are two different things. EG, a bunch of people could move out of SD (say half employed and half not) and our unemployment percent might drop as a result, but we'd have fewer employed people. As far as economic output is concerned (and that's my primary focus here), the number of people who DO have jobs is more important than the number of people who don't. Also, unemployment is a much more manipulated number, eg people don't count if they gave up looking for work. So employment is the better number to follow imho, and they can move in different directions in a given month.

To peterh, a poster named 4plexowner posted some good charts on this several months back in reply to my monthly job updates. As far as determining whether san diegans as a whole make enough to support the market, that is the focus of my semi-annual update on the price to income and price to rent ratios. (coming soon!)

Submitted by JC on July 24, 2010 - 6:29pm.

Thanks for not caling me an idiot. That was pretty silly of me. Still glad I posted though as I love the notice about the story that is coming soon. I can't wait to read that. Thanks for all of your great posts.

Submitted by outtamojo on July 28, 2010 - 12:07am.

UCSD to resume hiring dozens of professors http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2010/...

Callaway will move assembly work to Mexico http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2010/...

Win some lose some...

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